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5 Tips to find a job overseas
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Five tips to help you find a job overseas

Moving to a new country is, no doubt, one of the most exciting and interesting times of your life. But unless your company has transferred you, finding a job once you've arrived is the hardest part after securing a visa for your new country.

Prepare your CV or resume - go native!

Every country has different conventions for a CV or resume, and not understanding those differences can find you rejected instantly before your CV has even been read. For example, in Switzerland it is expected that you'll include a photo of yourself, your date of birth, visa or citizenship status, and frequently your marital status and number of children. On the other hand, in the United States, all of that information except visa status is illegal for an employer to ask of you, nor should you provide it in Australia.

In America, a CV is called a resume - unless it is for certain fields, such as academia. When CV is used in the US, it means a lengthy chronology of your academic achievements and only the bare bones about your work experience.

If you are moving to a country where you have little or no proficiency in a language, don't write your CV in the local language - otherwise they will probably expect you to show up for your interview and do the job while speaking the local language reasonably well! But do include information on your language ability on your CV, and if you're willing to learn the local language, be sure to let a prospective employer know.

Make sure to research CV or resume conventions in the country you're moving so you can tailor your presentation to suit local expectations.

Expect it to take longer than it would at home

Moving to a new country means you have no local background or local experience, which can make some employers hesitant to take a chance on hiring you. Be patient, and expect to answer questions about your decision to move to a new country. Use your decision to move to a new country as an example of being flexible and adaptable to change!

Start looking before you make the move to familiarise yourself with the job market in your chosen country and city, and start to apply for suitable positions a few months before your arrival.

Speak slowly and clearly

Even if you're speaking the same language, your accent will sound very different to foreign ears. If you have a strong regional accent, try to tone it down and always speak slowly and clearly. Try to rid your speech of localisms and slang that may not be universally understood.

Recruitment agencies

Sometimes, the best way to find a job as a new migrant is to be referred via an employment agency. They'll make the first introduction to the employer for you, and sell you to them before you've even arrived for the interview. A good recruiter is worth their weight in gold.

Word of mouth in the expat community

You might be thinking that you don't want to get involved in your local expat community - but frequently this is the best place to find a new job in an unfamiliar place. Join internet forums, clubs, and let everyone know that you're looking for work. You don't need to stick to expats just from home, branch out to international groups as well. This networking can also help you settle in to your new home quicker and make new friends.

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